• Can I work as an F-1 student?
    F-1 students are required to engage in full-time studies at a school approved by the Student and Exchange Visitors Program. F-1 students may work on-campus subject to certain conditions and restrictions. After the first academic year, F-1 students may engage in certain off-campus employment, including curricular practical training (CPT) or Optional Practical Training (OPT). However, an F-1 student may not engage in off-campus employment that is not related to his area of study.
  • My spouse petitioned for me, but we are now going through marital problems. What happens if we divorce before the green card is granted?
    If your divorce is finalized before your initial application for permanent residence is granted, you will no longer be eligible to receive a marriage-based green card. If you have a 2-year conditional green card and then you divorce your petitioning spouse, then you can apply to remove conditions without your spouse using a waiver of the joint filing requirement.
  • What happens if my I-130 sponsor dies?
    If your sponsor dies before your I-130 is approved, then your petition is revoked without possibility of reinstatement. If the sponsor dies after the I-130 approval, but before the green card has been approved, you might still be able to immigrate as the widow(er) of a U.S. citizen or by requesting reinstatement. The widow(ed) immigrant is eligible to apply for a green card within two years of the spouse's death, if the couple married in good faith (not to get the immigrant a green card), was not legally separated at the time of the death, and the immigrant has not remarried. If the immigrating relative is not your spouse, you may be able to apply for reinstatement. When your sponsor dies, USCIS expects the immigrant relative to come up with a substitute financial sponsor to file Form I-864. To qualify as a substitute sponsor, the person must be at least 18 years old, a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, and related to the immigrant as either a spouse, parent, mother-in-law, father-in-law, sibling, child, son, daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, grandparent, grandchild, or legal guardian. Once the I-864 is submitted, your immigrant relative would need to write a letter to USCIS stating a wish to have the case reinstated after it was revoked due to death of the initial sponsor.
  • Can I travel with an expired visa?
    Although there is no visa requirement for a domestic flight, it is not safe to travel, even domestically, with an expired visa and no pending status. Most airports are treated as border crossings, and the immigration authorities may request your immigration documents and hold you if you fail to present proper documentation or if you present expired documents.
  • How much money do I need to invest to qualify for a visa?
    There are multiple immigration options for foreign nationals who wish to invest in the U.S. The most popular options for foreign investors include E-2 and EB-5. The E-2 visa applies to nationals of a treaty country. While no precise amount is listed in the regulations, a recommended investment is about $100,000. The EB-5 requires a minimum investment of $500,000 in underemployed areas.
  • How can I apply to work in the United States?
    There is no such thing as a stand along work permit. You must either have an employment offer from an employer willing to sponsor your green card or an employment-based visa or be able to self-petition relying on your extraordinary qualifications. The other option is to start your own company. There are five types of employment-based visas:

    • EB-1: applicants with extraordinary abilities, outstanding professors and researchers, or multinational business managers and executives.
    • EB-2: applicants with exceptional abilities or advanced degrees.
    • EB-3: applicants who qualify as professional workers with a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree, or other skilled or unskilled workers
    • EB-4: applicants who are religious workers
    • EB-5: applicants who invest a minimum of $500,000 in an underemployed area and create 5 jobs

    There are also many different types of temporary work visas that allow you to remain in the US for a specific period of time. Listed below are some of of the most popular options:

    • E-1 Visas for Treaty Traders
    • E-2 Visas Treaty investors
    • H-1B Visas for Specialty Workers
    • L-1 Visas for Multinational Managers, Executives and Specialized Knowledge Employees
    • O-1 Visas for Aliens with Extraordinary Abilities
    • P-1 Visas for Internationally Recognized Entertainment Groups and Athletes
    • P-3 Visas for Culturally Unique Entertainment Groups
    • R-1 Visas for Religious Workers
    • TN Visas for professional workers from Mexico and Canada
  • I have a pending immigration case; how do I check my status?
    If you have a case pending with USCIS, you may check the status of your case at https://egov.uscis.gov/casestatus/landing.do using your case receipt number. If you have a pending consular case, you may check your status at https://ceac.state.gov/CEACStatTracker/Status.aspx using your Visa Case Number.
  • How much money do I need to invest to qualify for a visa?
    There are multiple immigration options for foreign nationals who wish to invest in the U.S. The most popular options for foreign investors include E-2 and EB-5. The E-2 visa applies to nationals of a treaty country. While no precise amount is listed in the regulations, a recommended investment is about $100,000. The EB-5 requires a minimum investment of $500,000 in underemployed areas.
  • How can I apply to work in the United States?
    There is no such thing as a stand along work permit. You must either have an employment offer from an employer willing to sponsor your green card or an employment-based visa or be able to self-petition relying on your extraordinary qualifications. The other option is to start your own company. There are five types of employment-based visas:

    • EB-1: applicants with extraordinary abilities, outstanding professors and researchers, or multinational business managers and executives.
    • EB-2: applicants with exceptional abilities or advanced degrees.
    • EB-3: applicants who qualify as professional workers with a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree, or other skilled or unskilled workers
    • EB-4: applicants who are religious workers
    • EB-5: applicants who invest a minimum of $500,000 in an underemployed area and create 5 jobs

    There are also many different types of temporary work visas that allow you to remain in the US for a specific period of time. Listed below are some of of the most popular options:

    • E-1 Visas for Treaty Traders
    • E-2 Visas Treaty investors
    • H-1B Visas for Specialty Workers
    • L-1 Visas for Multinational Managers, Executives and Specialized Knowledge Employees
    • O-1 Visas for Aliens with Extraordinary Abilities
    • P-1 Visas for Internationally Recognized Entertainment Groups and Athletes
    • P-3 Visas for Culturally Unique Entertainment Groups
    • R-1 Visas for Religious Workers
    • TN Visas for professional workers from Mexico and Canada
  • Can I work as an F-1 student?
    F-1 students are required to engage in full-time studies at a school approved by the Student and Exchange Visitors Program. F-1 students may work on-campus subject to certain conditions and restrictions. After the first academic year, F-1 students may engage in certain off-campus employment, including curricular practical training (CPT) or Optional Practical Training (OPT). However, an F-1 student may not engage in off-campus employment that is not related to his area of study.
  • My spouse petitioned for me, but we are now going through marital problems. What happens if we divorce before the green card is granted?
    If your divorce is finalized before your initial application for permanent residence is granted, you will no longer be eligible to receive a marriage-based green card. If you have a 2-year conditional green card and then you divorce your petitioning spouse, then you can apply to remove conditions without your spouse using a waiver of the joint filing requirement.
  • What happens if my I-130 sponsor dies?
    If your sponsor dies before your I-130 is approved, then your petition is revoked without possibility of reinstatement. If the sponsor dies after the I-130 approval, but before the green card has been approved, you might still be able to immigrate as the widow(er) of a U.S. citizen or by requesting reinstatement. The widow(ed) immigrant is eligible to apply for a green card within two years of the spouse's death, if the couple married in good faith (not to get the immigrant a green card), was not legally separated at the time of the death, and the immigrant has not remarried. If the immigrating relative is not your spouse, you may be able to apply for reinstatement. When your sponsor dies, USCIS expects the immigrant relative to come up with a substitute financial sponsor to file Form I-864. To qualify as a substitute sponsor, the person must be at least 18 years old, a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, and related to the immigrant as either a spouse, parent, mother-in-law, father-in-law, sibling, child, son, daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, grandparent, grandchild, or legal guardian. Once the I-864 is submitted, your immigrant relative would need to write a letter to USCIS stating a wish to have the case reinstated after it was revoked due to death of the initial sponsor.